Uncertainty in education

The UK vote to depart the EU Union on 23 June has left the schooling community going through an uncertain destiny. Polls performed by way of TES in advance of the vote indicated that 70% of instructors supported The United Kingdom staying within the European.

University educators across The United Kingdom have expressed dismay with the final results. Many are concerned that leaving the EU will enhance boundaries to get entry to for global college students – a marketplace many better education programmes depend on – along with the loss of studies funding from the EU.

The implications of the referendum result for colleges are a long way much less clean, partially due to the political turmoil following the result. Top minister David Cameron introduced his resignation as leader of the Conservative Birthday celebration following the result, triggering a leadership contest.

Sarah Robertson, the Royal Society of Chemistry’s director of schooling, said of the result, ‘We don’t recognise at the moment how the result of the referendum will affect chemistry instructors. However, the Royal Society of Chemistry stays dedicated to inclusive education for all beginners. We can be monitoring the effect of the final results on schools, colleges and universities and doing the whole thing we will aid teachers and students across The United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.’